• ArtW

In Conversation with Rinat Sherzer

Rinat Sherzer, interdisciplinary biotech engineer and ethical design strategist, shares her multi-faceted approach to spreading the wisdom of the female reproductive system– with each new endeavor she questions her peers and clients asking "what would the egg do?"

Hilla Singer & Ma’ayan S. Feigin, “The Tree” in the series Dancing with Glass, Part of "What Would the Egg Do?" Exhibition, 2020

x

To hear the audio version of the interview click here.


Marjorie Martay–

Rinat Sherzer is an interdisciplinary biotech engineer, ethical designer, social entrepreneur, and educator born in Tel Aviv and graduated from the Ben Gurion University. She has an MFA in design for Social Innovation from SVA (School of Visual Arts) in New York City. She's an adjunct professor at Parson's School of Design and mentors women from all over the world, helping them to reclaim their power. She was chosen by the UN to speak at the UN Women's Summit this past March 2020 for International Women's Day. Rinat, in your TED talk, you mentioned traveling and taking time to dive into the personal issues you were facing, can you share more about that time and what that introspection really felt and looked like for you? Include your ideas on the wisdom of nature and the body. How did that time serve as a building block to where you are now?


Rinat Sherzer–

I can talk about that. First of all, I'll give you a background story of why I went traveling. Um, the reason for that was because I was working around the clock in startup in Israel and had very, very high stress levels. After four years of working there, my body burned out. It talked for itself that it just can't do it anymore. At the beginning, I was reluctant to take time off. It wasn't something that I wanted to do, but I was so fatigued from overworking and decided that this was the necessary step. I went traveling around the world, mainly in the East, in India and Nepal. Those were my main points of travel. But I also traveled afterwards in Europe. During this time I decided to take a break from everything I knew as success– high paying jobs, lucrative titles, being in a power position. All of those things were set aside and I ventured into an unknown territory, which is understanding who I am without all those things– titles, income, etc. That year I mostly immersed myself in nature. I spent time doing yoga and meditation and a lot of embodiment work. I danced and connected to my body in any way possible– hiking and being in the ocean.



Marjorie Martay–

Sounds heavenly!


Rinat Sherzer–

It was very heavenly, but it also wasn't an instant transition. It took me a long time to get out of that endless running mode that we're all so programmed to live by. It wasn't that one day I just switched off and became this Zen master– not at all.

It took me most of the year that I was traveling to really learn how to live a different pace and to appreciate it. In our society, we're so used to measure success as actionable things– how much did we sell? How much did we gain? It's things that are very, very quantitative and moving into a more qualitative perspective took me a very long time. It's still a work in progress. I can't say that I've already mastered it.


But what I did learn about nature? I learned many things, not only through this year off, but also through studying bio-technology engineering and reading a lot about nature's mechanisms. Unlike the man-made world that we created, nature is cyclical. It works in cycles. If we look at the seasons of the year, there's spring and summer where everything blossoms and comes to fruition, and then there's autumn where things are shedding and then winter, which is the time where nature regenerates.

On the surface, things look like they're not happening, but actually this is the time when everything is happening underneath the surface to prepare for a new cycle. The same goes for the phases of the moon. If we look at the high tide and the low tide of the day and the night, nature is cyclical. I think that we're maybe the only species that just took all of that and said, no, that doesn't work for us. We're just going to work in a mindset of "the more, the better," "the winner takes it all," "the go, go, go" mindset that never stops. I think my biggest realization from nature is looking at that and looking at how unlike the man-made world that we created, nature creates zero waste. It only creates what it needs and then everything created breaks down, decomposes, and can be composed into something new. Every nutrient or every molecule has a role. It doesn't make for the sake of making. One organism can have something that is trash to them, but it is very essential and valuable to another organism. There's this really intricate mechanism where everything fits one into the other.


Marjorie Martay–

Everything's connected!


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, and for me, the sad thing about humanity is that we've completely detached ourselves from nature. We forgot that we are nature and that we're part of this tapestry that makes nature. So this is the essence of what I bring into my work: coming back to nature and furthermore learning from it and how it operates. The subject that I chose to zoom in on is one that's not usually discussed.

It's our reproductive systems and especially the female menstrual cycle, because it magically encompasses everything that I just talked about. Any person who menstruates has that compass ingrained inside of them and even women who are already in menopause, or post-menopause already have that compass, you know, embedded in their system, that cyclical compass. I chose that to focus in on the menstrual cycle, because it is a topic that is so shamed, that has so many taboos on top of it, when in fact it is the source of life. It is what creates life. So I look at those two things, the cycle of the egg and the attributes of the sperm and how they collaborate in order to create.

Marjorie Martay–

And that's when you came up with this whole idea of the three R's– rest receive and release?


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, at the time when I was working around the clock in the startup world, I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. The high stress levels caused my period to be irregular. Then when I went to the doctor, I was diagnosed with PCOS and ironically the Western medicine had no cure for this. The only thing that the doctors will tell you is to take the pill because it masks the symptoms. It makes you believe everything is okay, but actually it doesn't really get into the root of anything. It just completely covers up the problem. From that point, I went into researching the menstrual cycle and how it works.

It was really beautiful for me to have this amazing realization which was that within the rest, release and receive, the egg is so incredibly wise. It's an amazing blueprint of how nature was designed. It was designed to have a time where it's at rest (the winter time) where we perceive everything above the surface as dead, but beneath, everything is regenerating and rebuilding. During the menstrual time of the cycle, we often shame it as being dirty and disgusting. We don't want to talk about it. There's such a crazy taboo around it, but in reality, this is the most potent time because it's a time of heightened intuition. It's a time where we get a lot of downloads from the universe, from the worlds beyond, but also from our bodies of what we should be creating or what is called to be created in the next cycle. So I know the mindset might sound very spiritual and not rooted in science, but actually many studies have shown that during the time of menstruation, the right and left sides of the brain hemispheres are at peak communication with each other. This means that concepts that come from right side (creativity, expression, abstract, bliss and understanding the deep secrets of the universe) have a clear path into the left side of the brain so that we can bring it into materialization or manifestation within the physical world. We like to call intuition and sometimes people think that intuition is not a real thing. But when you menstruate, your connections between the right side of the hemisphere and the left side of the hemisphere are stronger, which allows you to bring more creative ideas into expression. For me, this time is "winter," the time of rest. It's really the most neglected in our society, but the most potent as well.

I could go on, but I want to get to the receive and the release. So the time just before the menstrual phase is the most literal stage of the cycle. It's when the body realizes that life was not created. There was ovulation, but no inception between the sperm and egg so it prepares for the winter. This is such an amazing time of release and understanding what works in our world, what doesn't work, what we should shed and let go of and what we should keep. In our society today, we're just so much on a go, go, go, running, nonstop mode that we rarely get that gift of reflection or understanding what doesn't serve us and what we're going to let go of.


Then, the receive is maybe the biggest mindset shift that we could adopt in our society. In my TED talk, I talk about the sperm and the egg and how we've been programmed to achieve or be on the run like sperm. The one out of a million that succeeds by getting to the goal the quickest. The egg's strategy is completely different, but just as powerful, if not more. She's in the receptive mode. Millions of sperm come to her and unlike what we've been taught to think, that she's idle and lazy and lays there waiting to be penetrated, she's actually the one that chooses.

When I read the recent study about that, I was so blown away because in our society, the whole concept of achieving is winning the race and getting to whatever prize first. Whereas we never think of the power receptivity and being able to choose the right option. For me, that holds the key to a really huge societal transformation. From there came the name of my project, "What Would the Egg Do?" So whenever you find yourself frantically running to the next goal, stop and ask yourself, what would the egg do right now? How can I be receptive and beaming with brilliance, beauty and energy that whatever I am seeking will come to me I will be able to choose the right option?


Marjorie Martay–

It's so interesting that we started with the whole idea of traveling which slowed you down– that was your rest period. Following nature, doing yoga, getting into meditation led to becoming more intuitive, feeling all these things coming to you and allowing that time for you to really heal. Now you've gone on beyond that and the area of release by choosing and receiving the right option. In your case, the right option was this idea that in the past, you were running so quickly, but now it is a time for you to relax, take in and learn another path for yourself. So now you've gone on to start your own business and move forward looking at these concepts in a completely different way, which is pretty amazing!


Rinat Sherzer–

You captured the essence of it because you started the question with what was this year like? Sometimes I am hesitant to say the answer because it wasn't a year of doing it. It wasn't a year of achieving anything, but as you said so beautifully, without that time of taking time off and being in the unknown void, I wouldn't have come up with all the things that happened afterwards. I think that with COVID and the pandemic this year, this is exactly our opportunity. It is an opportunity to be an egg for a bit, to go inwards, be still, be very reflective, think of what works, and what doesn't work. It is also a time to see all the injustice that is happening in our world in a very clear way, and then come out of it with a new action plan or a new way of being in the world. Hopefully we are bursting into a new era.


Marjorie Martay–

Yes, from a personal perspective, when COVID happened, I had so much time on my hands and I wanted to try to make a difference. I reached out to Sara who I've worked with on ArtW and another wonderful woman named Lisa Fiero whom I created "Women: We Create" experiential journeys with. I wanted to go beyond the journeys and hear voices of incredible artists from around the world. So the "Women: We Create" blog came out of COVID and the rest period where I was saying, "well, what can we do?" How can we bring all these amazing women that I've met over the years together in one place and have people either collaborate or talk to each other or just hear what they had to say. It's so fantastic.


Well, you are one of the most creative people, but you're not a traditional artist per se. Your way of dealing with everything in your life–your work, your education, your studies– you have really created something that is very unique for you and then given that power to others. If you were to call yourself an artist, what would your product be? And your process?


Rinat Sherzer–

Thank you so much. That really touches me. Right, I'm definitely not a traditional artist. I don't paint or work with textiles or build installations. The closest to an art form that I create is the poems that I write. But, that's mainly a hobby. Maybe one of them was published, but I wouldn't call myself a poet.

I think my art is bringing diverse people face to face with new concepts or new ways of looking into the world and creating a space or a container for them to transform through it. I think of the different work that I do– I have an innovation consultancy where we bring these concepts of rest, release and receive into the business setting.

I talk very directly to the menstrual cycle, the power in it and the egg's wisdom. But, sometimes I "Trojan horse" it and just talk about the qualities of rest, release and receive as the strategies for business. I bring that into the courses that I teach at Parsons where I do a lot of work with students around social impact and sustainability. Without that look into nature and how it operates, I don't believe that we can create anything that is truly sustainable. In the artistic modality of what I do, there is the exhibition that just opened two days ago called "What Would the Egg Do?" where I curated a collection of artwork from different artists. The exhibition is based on an open call which asks artists to create over four consecutive weeks aligned with the cycle of the egg. Whatever they created for it would be in four small parts– each week would be a different part of their creation. The idea was to see the dynamic element of the creation process and how the work progressed over those four weeks. But furthermore, it was to give those artists the chance to embody the wisdom of the egg, to connect to it, to understand it and to create something out of that system and wisdom. I believe it is something that we all love to remember.


We are all organisms that are part of nature which is part of the planet and we've forgotten our cycles. We forgot that not every day we can be full on. The times that we need to dance, to draw and to have fun are not less important than the times that we go out and close the next big deal with a client.

It was great to bring those concepts or principles into the creation process. We got an incredible array of artworks which blew my mind. It was really beyond what I expected. We just launched it two days ago with the help of the amazing team that is behind this project.


Emily Arlington, Part of the series Broken Binary, 2020

Marjorie Martay–

We'll definitely come back to that. I'd love to turn this over to a phenomenal person, wonderful writer, a dancer, and an artist herself, Sara, go ahead.


Sara Dotterer–

First of all, in hearing you talk about not thinking of yourself as a traditional artist, I think that oftentimes we put art in such a narrow box, but really it is like you're saying... just transforming an environment or a perspective, and you do just that all the time. That was a really lovely perspective, so thank you. In reference to your TED talk and the way that you've been able to use your story to help others, you've made the story look very linear and effortless. But I know that it took a lot of work to connect all the dots and craft the best version of that. How did you go about crafting your story in a way that would appeal to others and educate them or help them? What did this process look like? Do you see this storytelling that you do as an art within itself?


Rinat Sherzer–

Wow. There's lots to unpack there! First of all, regarding connecting the dots, it is only something that you can do in hindsight, right? It's not something that you can do while you're in the process. In the moment, you go through one experience and then another experience and so on. The moment of connection, when the picture makes sense is often after a very long time. It's after– I don't even want to say hard work, but rather a lot of time being uncertain, like what we've been through now in COVID.

A lot of times it's really not understanding what is happening and feeling an outcast of society. It often feels very unproductive in the traditional way that we measure productivity or success. There is a lot of self doubt and open question marks that took a very long time to be answered. I knew that I was onto something big, but I didn't know all that it would become. I just knew that the old system didn't work for me any longer. It just urged me to go on a quest. If I did make it seem linear, then maybe I didn't do my job right because my whole concept or philosophy is moving us as a society from this linear approach that we need to go from A to B to one that is more cyclical. This new view shows that we keep coming back to the same places, but our perspective is a bit different. All to say, it was definitely not linear. It was definitely not a joyful process! Whatever has been birthed out of it was filled with a lot of self doubt and feeling that I don't belong in the way that society operates.

But, all along I had a very deep sense– I don't know if it's a calling but my Northern star was knowing that the way that we've designed our society is not sustainable. It's this deep, deep, deep knowledge that we can't continue like this. We can't continue consuming so much, producing so much, and evaluating things on very narrow concepts like a company's success being its bottom line and how much money it makes. Instead, what are the repercussions of that the company on the environment, on the people that they're hiring, on the community where maybe the factory is embedded? Being defined by the bottom line is certainly a narrow way of looking at things and not a realistic one. Something that really was true to me was my Northern star through my whole process, but I feel like I am still on my journey connecting the dots. I don't feel like I know the full picture. I have a nugget of something– tapping into that wisdom of our reproductive systems. I feel there's something there that we can explore further. I think just seeing people's reactions when they hear that and how the point resonates, that makes me know that I'm on the right track. It does talk about some universal truth that we've all forgotten to remember.


Marjorie Martay–

I was curious this sort of journey you went on– at what point did you decide to start "Of Course Global" which is your vehicle for working with companies and teaching them how to do things in a different way. You use this consultancy to educate others on the importance of integrating masculine and feminine qualities to affect productivity and creativity. When did you decide to start your own consulting firm to deal with some of these issues that you feel very strongly about, take your perspective out into the business world and see how you really can have an impact that way? You've been very successful with clients like Microsoft, Pfizer and Capital One. You've done a great job and I very much appreciate that coming from a corporate background and now being in the creative and not-for-profit sector. I try to utilize some of these things that you're sort of talking about (integrating masculine and feminine qualities), but but I'm curious on your journey, what made you decide to put the stake in the ground and do it?



Rinat Sherzer–

I moved to New York about six years ago or that's when I attended my master's program in a field called Design for Social Innovation. In the program, you utilize different disciplines from the creative world in business and not-for-profits settings to create social or environmental change. When I was getting my masters, that's when a big connecting the dots moment was because I understood everything that was going in my my head up until then. There was a sense of arriving home and understanding that there is place for my ways of thinking. Then when I graduated, it was me and a dear friend of mine, Hannah Phang, that started "Of Course Global."

It started with a really casual conversations amongst friends– which is always where the best things happen. We sat and said "what if we can go into corporations and teach them the way of the feminine." Then a few others said, "of course, and what if we can go in and help them create projects help underserved communities or help an environmental issue." Then another friend would say, "yeah, of course." Then all of the sudden we realized that we're onto something. We also had a name for the company, "Of Course."

That was how it was born and then unfortunately, Hannah had to leave the country because of immigration issues. She didn't get a visa to stay and that was very heartbreaking. It pushed me to redefine what "Of Course" was and ask myself, "what can I do with this?" It was just me and it was a very difficult time. But before that difficult time, we had some really amazing success working with companies like Capital One and Pfizer, and the way that we pushed it forward was more on the innovation side. We came up with new creative solutions for their business, while the elements of social impact, sustainability, and the modalities of resting, releasing and receiving were kind of chore horses at times.



After my TED talk is when I decided to go full on with that idea and we created a curriculum that is called, "what would the egg do?" It teaches the wisdom of the egg and incorporates it into how businesses build strategies. For example, how can we launch a new product instead of running after the next goal? How can we instead let it come to us with that mindset shift of what does it mean to be receptive rather than the go-getter sometimes? The whole idea of the integration of the masculine and feminine is to be skillful in that dance of when is the time to be a go-getter and when is the time to be receptive. So we work with companies on how they can move between the two in a more elegant way, playing off the left brain versus the right.

Marjorie Martay–

Yes, it's so amazing what you've done to take this concept and bring it forward in so many different ways whether it's through your company or an educational curriculum. It's a thread that has taken you through so many areas and you've brought it to fruition. It is too bad about Hannah...where is she now by the way?


Rinat Sherzer–

She's in London and doing amazing work with her own podcast, which is called "Crystals, Clits and Climate." She talks a lot about spirituality, sexuality, and sustainability. She's really doing some wonderful work now in London and actually the full circle of this is that right now we are collaborating on creating a workshop combining "What Would the Egg Do?" and her podcast.



Marjorie Martay–

Oh that's great! Who knows? Maybe we'll have to interview her.


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, I would love to connect that.


Marjorie Martay–

The great thing about "Women: We Create" is it's this network that we're creating– just like how Victoria suggested you. We've had a number of other artists suggest other people and it's a wonderful thing to be pulling all that together. It's been a great journey for both Sara and I. So let's go back to the exhibition (What would the Egg Do?), how long did it take you to pull this whole thing together? What a great idea to have the artists look at a four week period and create through their own stages of that time.



Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, it actually happened over a conversation I had with Victoria. We met at Parsons. I teach an intensive module within a studio that she teaches. She was sitting in on my class and we were so excited talking about what she does and what I do. Then we were talking about the menstrual cycle and the work that I do around that. Then she said, "this is an amazing idea for an exhibition. You should do it." Then this whole thing came to life. It was over conversation with Victoria. She has been an amazing support and is an amazing woman as well. She is incredible, so talented, driven and passionate. She's an embodied, divine feminine really. So the conversation started with her and we wanted to bring this exhibition into a gallery. We had a space that we were lined up for at Parsons and all of that was amazing and then COVID hit. It took me some time to get back to the project. For a little while I thought it was gone, but then something really magical happened. Different women started to gravitate towards this project very organically. I didn't push towards that, but it just happened.



Marjorie Martay–

The universe was trying to help you!


Rinat Sherzer–

A hundred percent! The creative director, Miruna Macri, who is a phenomenal designer that designed the whole visual language for the exhibition. Our program director, who was at the time studying at Skidmore, just picked up the whole social media and made it her own. Then another student of mine at Parsons, Emily Arlington said to me, I want to help you produce it. She did the whole web production of this thing, and she's been an immense help. This thing would never have happened without her, without the whole team. But it's been such a beautiful collection of women who just really liked the idea and made it come to life so I can't say enough about how appreciative I am. What a beautiful experience it has been for me; it's been very different from the other projects that I've done where it's more goal oriented– where we need to get somewhere. This emerged organically.



Marjorie Martay–

Do you think it had something to do with working with very amazing, talented artists that you were so compatible with and very definitely took your ideas and created them in their own space?


Rinat Sherzer–

A hundred percent. I couldn't have said it better myself. It's such a collaborative project and each one made it their own. I think that was when Sara asked me about being an artist, and I said maybe my art is creating spaces for transformational experiences for other people– for them to give it their own voice and their own interpretation... it was exactly that. When I look at the artworks that were presented, it's such an array of topics that they tap into. The interpretation that each artist gave to the prompt blows my mind. I'm seeing one woman talk about ancestral, black women's trauma and how she makes work around that with the cycles of the lunar system– her artwork is facilitating a workshops through this exhibition space. Another artist talks about her queer experience and her body being her teacher. She documented what happens to her body every day throughout 28 days using textiles. Another two artists created this incredible blown glass installation of little figures of women, all intertwined through each other making this tree of life. It is really mind blowing to see what has been created out of a very simple prompt.

Marjorie Martay–

We will include the exhibition in the interview post! Please click here to view the exhibit.


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, we just launched and anything that would get the word out to people to see it and experience it for themselves. The open call is still open and the exhibition is going to run for six months. So any artist that wants to participate can submit their work and we'll be rotating artwork every month. Definitely anything that could get the word out to other artists to embody and connect to the wisdom of the egg and to create from that perspective would be a blessing!

The Maze, Ye'ela Wilschanski, 2020


Sara Dotterer–

You've alluded to it a bit but with all of the discussion of the right and the left brain, what do you think the relationship between artists and engineers has to be in today's world? Do you see them as two separate practices? Do you see your own work as a little bit of a bridge between those two worlds? What is your perspective on how practitioners on either side could benefit from learning from one another?


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, definitely. First of all, I keep going back to nature and how nature operates, but nature thrives on diversity. Nature is the strongest when it has different things come together. Whether I teach in universities or with clients, I tell them that the core element or the key to innovation is bringing in diverse minds and talents to solve a problem because each one brings their own unique perspective, their own skills and talents. Using those different perspectives, we can come up with something that neither of the sides would have been able to do otherwise. There's a lot of cross pollination between the two– art and engineering.

Traditionally how we like to think about engineering is it is very scientific and analytical, but it also requires so much creativity to come up with solutions or to problem solve in a way that wasn't thought of before. There's a lot of creativity that goes into engineering, but it is based more on facts and numbers– the left brain. If we look at the yin and the yang, the creativity would be the white part inside of the black. Then on the other side, being an artist, you have this freedom of expression. You have the agency to bring to life ideas that are out of consensus, that are thought-provoking, that are not in the mainstream. But then also you need some tactical or analytical tools of how to bring that forward. If you look at how textile art works, there's a lot of very meticulous, regimented practices in it that can be called engineering. So yes, I definitely see a cross pollination between the two, and I really believe that in order to create anything effective, we need diverse perspectives. We need diverse skills to come into it.

In terms of seeing myself as a bridge, I hope that would be my gift to the world, but it also seems a bit presumptuous for me to say that. I know that I'm very deeply connected both to my right side of the brain and the left side. I think that the times that I succeed are the times that I can move ideas from one side to the other and vice versa. I think the way that I go about discussing gender equality and provoking thoughts around the menstrual cycle, I do that in a very scientific way to get past resistance. I do use tools from both sides to move the message forward.

Juliana Luna, “Untitled” in the series The Aluna Method, 2020. Photography by Lilo Oliveira


Marjorie Martay–

I'm curious, you've been spending some wonderful time in Israel now with your family? Are you in Tel Aviv?


Rinat Sherzer–

No, I'm in the South of the country, in a city called Be'er Sheva. I'll be here until Sunday and then I'm free to go back to Tel Aviv.


Marjorie Martay–

I was reading that your father was an engineer as well? Did that have a lot to do with you becoming an engineer yourself?


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, I think it has everything to do with that. I wanted to be like him my whole life. He's such an inspiring man. He's been working in green tech before it was a thing. He recycles water. He's been a huge source of inspiration for me. There's a stage in your life where all you want to do is be like your parents. Then there's a stage where you have to find your autonomy and your tone of voice. I think "What would the egg do?" would definitely not have happened if I had stayed in Israel.


Marjorie Martay–

So it's great you came to New York!


Rinat Sherzer–

It is, yes. I can't imagine a better pivot to my life.


Marjorie Martay–

That's wonderful– it's always great to feel that you're in the right place and be the person that you want to be. It opens up everything for you. Whether it's a stimulation, your friends, your education that you did here, the collaboration that you've had through Parsons, it's all those things– starting your company, meeting Hannah, and having that conversation– it all comes together.


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes. New York has always been my source of inspiration or my fire. I feel so blessed to live in this city.


Marjorie Martay–

That's great. So what do you think next is for you?


Rinat Sherzer–

Oh, I don't know. I really want to see this exhibition grow and reach more audiences and artists. Hopefully we can bring it into a physical gallery or a museum when things start to open up again. There's also a documentary in the works about the menstrual cycle and the wisdom of the egg and how we can bring it into the way that we problem solve in our society. I hope to see that into fruition as well. I hope to refine my ability to move between the masculine and the feminine more freely. It's a never ending journey. It's not something that I've arrived to– I would love to deepen the connection with both sides.

Untitled (Chief Handker) - Part 3, Alex Goldberg, 2020

Marjorie Martay–

Yes, right, that sounds great! Well, I can say that Sara and I have so enjoyed this discussion and having you as part of this, we will try to do everything we can to promote this exhibition for you!


Rinat Sherzer–

Yes, that would be wonderful.


Marjorie Martay–

I have so much respect for you, and I think you have come up with something that is really transformative. It will continue to grow and build! From a corporate perspective, there's no question that your perspective is very definitely the future, and from a creative perspective, these ideas can only further be amplified with artists. I would like to leave with that and just say that I look forward to seeing you personally face to face sometime soon. I look forward to seeing this exhibition grow and I know you will continue to do phenomenal things with your life!

Rinat Sherzer–

Thank you so much, and you as well! The "Women: We Create" is an amazing initiative. The idea of bringing women together and creating that sense of community is so needed in our world. Thank you so much for the work that you're doing.


Marjorie Martay–

Well, my pleasure and you take care!


–––


Please read more about Rinat Sherzer and her current exhibition below:

  • Instagram

All Rights Reserved to Marjorie W. Martay. © 2020 by ArtW and Women We Create. Proudly created with Wix.com

image001.png